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About us

The roots of fireworks date back to the black powder that was invented in China around the 6th century AD. After that, it was transmitted to the Middle East and Europe through the Silk Road, and it is said that it was transmitted to Japan around the 15th century AD.
Fireworks were actively produced in Italy in Europe, used in religious and royal events. In Japan, fireworks were actively produced in Aichi, Nagano, Niigata, Akita, and Ibaragi Pref., which are closely related to General Tokugawa during the Edo period(1603 - 1868). In terms of technology, science and technology developed in Europe around the 18th and 19th centuries, enabling bright fireworks using new compounds such as potassium chlorate and enriching colors. After that, white fireworks using aluminum and magnesium and fireworks combining acoustic effects appeared. In Japan, fireworks with devised ways of falling, openning, and shining, such as fireworks with parashute, forming, containing many small shells, time wave fireworks, have appeared.
And in the 21th century, fireworks are evolving with digital technology. Theatrical Star Mine, which has a large number of launch tubes electrically connected to igniters and computers and fireworks displays that are synchronized with music, is becoming popular. Pyrotechnists are demanded programming that creates a play by comprehensively combining shoot angles, heights, combinations of fireworks shells, rhythms, etc. with music in 0.1 second units. When fireworks, programmers, composers, directors and many other proffesionals come together, fireworks will become more wonderful arts. With that in mind, we have established the association as an organization specialized in fireworks software technology.
I hope that fireworks continue to evolve into a field of art called "fireworks art" with the help of everyone.
Founder of Simulation Fireworks Association

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